Ukraine marks Chernobyl disaster amid efforts

Ukraine marks Chernobyl disaster amid efforts.

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Chernobyl: The Aftermath of Wormwood by Dawn Adams

Today is the anniversary of the world’s most serious accident in the history of the nuclear industry.  On 26th April 1986 at 1:24am, reactor No.4 at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in the Ukraine exploded after a systems maintenance test went disastrously wrong.  It is the only accident to date in the history of commercial nuclear power to sustain fatalities from radiation.

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Reactor No.4, Chernobyl, Ukraine, 2012.

Chernobyl is a significant historic disaster, which has resulted in a perpetual legacy of dire circumstances on human health and the environment.  A terrain of over 260,000 square kilometres has been left highly contaminated by this catastrophic event.  It is estimated that normal levels of radiation will only return to these areas in approximately 100,000 years.

ImageChernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, Ukraine, 2012.

My final major project Chernobyl: The Aftermath of Wormwood will be exhibited at the Hoxton Arches, Gallery 402, London from 21st – 24th May, along with 14 other graduating students from the University of Kent.

 

RawBAexhibition

Today is the anniversary of the world’s most serious accident in the history of the nuclear industry.  On 26th April 1986 at 1:24am, reactor No.4 at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in the Ukraine exploded after a systems maintenance test went disastrously wrong.  It is the only accident to date in the history of commercial nuclear power to sustain fatalities from radiation.

Image

Reactor No.4, Chernobyl, Ukraine, 2012.

Chernobyl is a significant historic disaster, which has resulted in a perpetual legacy of dire circumstances on human health and the environment.  A terrain of over 260,000 square kilometres has been left highly contaminated by this catastrophic event.  It is estimated that normal levels of radiation will only return to these areas in approximately 100,000 years.

 ImageChernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, Ukraine, 2012.

My study aims to show the radioactive wilderness that remains today.  A tragic reminder of what happens when science…

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Ghosts of Power

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Ghosts of Power

This is a study of decommissioned power stations in the South East of England. These once functional architectural structures hover over our landscapes as echoes of their former importance.

They are symbols of mans progress that in the past have supplied energy and power that is essential to our daily lives. Today they sit quietly, waiting for their futures to be decided.

RawBAexhibition

We would love to invite you all to our graduating exhibition which will be running from the 21st – 24th of May , there will be 15 of us showing a very diverse range of photographic work from fashion and documentary to fine art including instillation and projection.

The exhibition is being held at Hoxton Arches Gallery 402 , it’s a beautiful space , as you can see set in the heart of creativeLondon. Opening times will follow soon !

Hope you can make it .
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18 Seconds

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This is an experiment in the moving image, following a project brief from Uni as part of my BA in photography.

The imagery was inspired by the song “18 Seconds”, itself inspired by the following statistic:

“According to the World Health Organisation, every 18 seconds someone in the world becomes infected with HIV”.

18 Seconds is performed by Seven Words, available from iTunes.

Temple Manor

Temple Manor is a lovely old 13th Century Manor House situated in Strood, Rochester, Kent. Bizarrely it is now surrounded by an industrial estate where as in it’s prime it was a royal manor house that was given to the Knights Templar by Henry ll. The Knights Templar was a religious and military order that was established to protect pilgrims journeying to the Holy Land. A perfect setting for a test shoot with my two friends Amy Stills, stylist and Lauren Mathias, make up.


A TOWN UNEARTHED.

One of my summer projects was to photograph an archaeological dig in Folkestone, Kent. This is a three year scheme that is working closely with the local community to document the archaeological heritage of Folkestone.  I chose to use my old Bronica ETR as I enjoy working in film and thought that the fine grain would compliment this project.