Chernobyl: The Aftermath of Wormwood by Dawn Adams

Today is the anniversary of the world’s most serious accident in the history of the nuclear industry.  On 26th April 1986 at 1:24am, reactor No.4 at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in the Ukraine exploded after a systems maintenance test went disastrously wrong.  It is the only accident to date in the history of commercial nuclear power to sustain fatalities from radiation.

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Reactor No.4, Chernobyl, Ukraine, 2012.

Chernobyl is a significant historic disaster, which has resulted in a perpetual legacy of dire circumstances on human health and the environment.  A terrain of over 260,000 square kilometres has been left highly contaminated by this catastrophic event.  It is estimated that normal levels of radiation will only return to these areas in approximately 100,000 years.

ImageChernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, Ukraine, 2012.

My final major project Chernobyl: The Aftermath of Wormwood will be exhibited at the Hoxton Arches, Gallery 402, London from 21st – 24th May, along with 14 other graduating students from the University of Kent.

 

RawBAexhibition

Today is the anniversary of the world’s most serious accident in the history of the nuclear industry.  On 26th April 1986 at 1:24am, reactor No.4 at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in the Ukraine exploded after a systems maintenance test went disastrously wrong.  It is the only accident to date in the history of commercial nuclear power to sustain fatalities from radiation.

Image

Reactor No.4, Chernobyl, Ukraine, 2012.

Chernobyl is a significant historic disaster, which has resulted in a perpetual legacy of dire circumstances on human health and the environment.  A terrain of over 260,000 square kilometres has been left highly contaminated by this catastrophic event.  It is estimated that normal levels of radiation will only return to these areas in approximately 100,000 years.

 ImageChernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, Ukraine, 2012.

My study aims to show the radioactive wilderness that remains today.  A tragic reminder of what happens when science…

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Ghosts of Power

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Ghosts of Power

This is a study of decommissioned power stations in the South East of England. These once functional architectural structures hover over our landscapes as echoes of their former importance.

They are symbols of mans progress that in the past have supplied energy and power that is essential to our daily lives. Today they sit quietly, waiting for their futures to be decided.